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While I was not surprised that The Beverly Review published the letter to the editor (Sept. 2) that falsely accused the pro-law-enforcement sign at McNally’s of being racist and divisive, I was disappointed that your publication would lend credence to such nonsense.

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As the Southside Catholic Peace and Justice Committee—you may recognize us from the “You Are My Neighbor” events—we feel compelled to respond to both Ms. Emily Schmidt’s letter to the editor (Sept. 2) about the sign at McNally’s and the responses to her letter (Sept. 9, 16) in The Beverly Review.

Don’t be taken in; our security cameras need to stay private. Giving the government access to our homes is a terrible idea, and one we should not be entertaining.

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As a parent at Kellogg Elementary School, I believe the recently proposed capital investment plan for the school has some welcomed attributes, but it falls short in addressing our school’s most pressing needs.

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As a member of the Kellogg Elementary School Local School Council (LSC) and leading the charge for an addition at the school, I was excited that Kellogg is finally getting some investment.

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I’m writing to respond to the letter from Greg Fischer of Wild Blossom Meadery and Winery (Aug. 5), which expressed understandable concerns about increasing property taxes and the role of the Cook County Assessor’s Office in determining property values.

The letter to the editor (July 29) from an author, who requested their name not be published and bemoaned our local businesses, was absurd, especially considering the daunting challenges they are facing during this pandemic.

In the July 29 issue, an author who requested their name not be published criticized several businesses because they made mistakes and didn’t meet the author’s criteria for what it means to “Shop Local.”

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In the letter to the editor (July 29) from “Name Withheld by Request,” the author wrote about disappointment in the quality of experiences at local small businesses and said they will now patronize businesses in surrounding suburbs.

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Long ago, I had an article that was published in The Beverly Review in the 1930s. In reading the article, one would think black folks were taking over Beverly/Morgan Park.

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